Guantanamo prisoner 'kills himself'

Yemeni detainee found dead in "apparent suicide", US military says.

    About 240 prisoners remain
    held at Guantanamo Bay [EPA]

    The Yemeni prisoner, known as al-Hanashi, had been held without charge at the camp since February 2002.

    Saleh had travelled Afghanistan in 2001 and joined the Taliban, according to declassified US military documents.

    But he later said he was to forced to fight by the group and denied any link to al-Qaeda, the documents say.

    Guantanamo future

    Saleh had been on hunger strikes in the past to protest his detention, but was not among long-term hunger strikers currently being force-fed at the camp, a Guantanamo spokesman said.

    Saleh is the fifth prisoner to commit suicide
    at the camp since 2002 [GALLO/GETTY] 
    An autopsy was due to be carried out and a "cultural adviser" was ensuring that his body was being treated in accordance with Islamic traditions, the military said.

    "Upon completion of the autopsy, the remains will be prepared for repatriation to Yemen," the military said.

    Since the detention camp opened in January 2002, four other prisoners have committed suicide by hanging themselves in their cells - three on the same day in June 2006 and one in May 2007.

    Another prisoner died of colorectal cancer in December 2007.

    The White House is still considering what to do with the 239 remaining captives held at Guantanamo, who include nearly 100 Yemenis.

    Barack Obama, the US president, has ordered the camp be closed by January 2010.


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Explore how your country voted on global issues since 1946, as the world gears up for the 74th UN General Assembly.

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    We dialled more than 35,000 random phone numbers to paint an accurate picture of displacement across South Sudan.

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Meet the man on a mission to take down Cambodia's timber tycoons and expose a rampant illegal cross-border trade.