TV bosses charged over al-Manar

Terrorism charges are brought against two men for airing Hezbollah's al-Manar TV.

    Al-Manar's logo

    Lawyers for both men did not comment. The men are due to appear again on January 8.

     

    'Recruitment activities'

     

    The US treasury department froze the US assets of al-Manar, the Lebanon-based channel in March, saying it supported the fund-raising and recruitment activities of Hezbollah.

     

    Iqbal, a Pakistani who moved to the US 24 years ago and lives in New York, was arrested and first charged in August with providing satellite customers with the Hezbollah-operated channel.

     

    Al-Manar regularly airs speeches by Hassan Nasrallah,
    the Hezbollah director-general

    According to the new charges, between September 2005 and August 2006, the two men used the television company they own, Brooklyn-based HDTV, to negotiate with representatives of the al-Manar network to air the channel.

     

    Court documents said Elahwal, who lives in New Jersey, and Iqbal were paid by al-Manar more than $111,000 between December and March.

     

    The channel provided wide coverage of the war between Hezbollah and Israel last summer, broadcasting exclusive footage shot by Hezbollah fighters. It was attacked by Israeli air strikes during the 34-day war.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera + Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Explore how your country voted on global issues since 1946, as the world gears up for the 74th UN General Assembly.

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    We dialled more than 35,000 random phone numbers to paint an accurate picture of displacement across South Sudan.

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Meet the man on a mission to take down Cambodia's timber tycoons and expose a rampant illegal cross-border trade.