Remittances offer Somali lifeline

Informal family business in Somaliland is a multi-million dollar empire.

    Somalia's two decades-old civil war has left most of the Horn of Africa in shambles, but there are pockets of relative calm.

    One such area is Somaliland, which has effectively become a separate state from the rest of Somalia although it is not officially recognised.

    Somaliland is made up of almost 3.5 million people and its economy is dependent on agriculture, livestock and remittances from the many thousands who live abroad.

    It is estimated that the region receives at least $700m in remittances a year.

    Mohammed Adow reports from Hargeysa on the money transfers that have become big business.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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