Free secondary education for Uganda

Government enlists 1,000 schools to teach the poorest citizens.

    Many children do not go to secondary school because their families cannot afford it [GALLO/GETTY]


    He said: "It [the education programme] will double enrolment."
     
    The move comes after an earlier initiative that aimed to give free universal primary education.
     

    "It's a pro-poor programme that will help rural communities develop"

    Robinson Nsumba-Lyazi,
    acting secondary education commissioner

    Many children are prevented from continuing their education beyond primary school because their families are unable to afford the average $130 per year fees.
     
    On average, Ugandans earn about $300 per person per year.
     
    Nsumba-Lyazi said only 150,000 primary school students last year went on to continue their education.
     
    "Without USE [Universal Secondary Education] the dropout rate is about 50 per cent," he said.
     
    Nsumba-Lyazi said the programme would cost an estimated 30 billion Uganda shillings ($17.2m) this year.
     
    About 1,000 government and private secondary schools have been enlisted by the government in order to absorb the new students free of charge.
     
    Uganda, a country of 27 million people, ranks 145th on the United Nations Human Development Index, which measures income, education and life expectancy out of 177 countries.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'We will cut your throats': The anatomy of Greece's lynch mobs

    The brutality of Greece's racist lynch mobs

    With anti-migrant violence hitting a fever pitch, victims ask why Greek authorities have carried out so few arrests.

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    How a homegrown burger joint pioneered a food revolution and decades later gave a young, politicised class its identity.

    From Cameroon to US-Mexico border: 'We saw corpses along the way'

    'We saw corpses along the way'

    Kombo Yannick is one of the many African asylum seekers braving the longer Latin America route to the US.