Arson attack on mosque in Berlin

Another mosque frequented by the Turkish community in Germany was attacked on Friday.

    Muslims pray during Friday prayers at the Turkish Kuba Camii mosque located near a hotel housing refugees in Cologne's district of Kalk, Germany, October 14, 2016 [Wolfgang Rattay/Reuters]
    Muslims pray during Friday prayers at the Turkish Kuba Camii mosque located near a hotel housing refugees in Cologne's district of Kalk, Germany, October 14, 2016 [Wolfgang Rattay/Reuters]

    A mosque in Berlin has been set on fire by masked assailants in the early hours of Sunday morning.  

    "Witnesses told us that three assailants with covered faces threw burning material and immediately ran away," said Bayram Turk, the head of the mosque association.

    This attacks comes only a few days after another mosque frequented by the Turkish community in Germany was attacked on Friday. 

    Turkish Community in Germany 

    On Friday, the Aksemsettin Mosque - belonging to the Muslim-Turkish association Islamic Community National View (IGMG) - in the town of Lauffen am Neckar was also attacked.

    Germany has a three million-strong Turkish community, many of whom are second and third-generation German-born citizens of Turkish descent whose grandparents moved to the country during the 1960s.

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    SOURCE: Anadolu news agency


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