New pyramid remains discovered south of Cairo

Remains found 40km south of Cairo could be of Egypt's first attempt to build a smooth-sided pyramid, officials say.

    New pyramid remains discovered south of Cairo
    The remains were located north of King Sneferu's bent pyramid south of Cairo [Asmaa Waguih/Reuters]

    A top antiquities official said that an Egyptian excavation team has discovered the remains of a new pyramid that dates back to the 13th Dynasty, some 3,700 years ago.

    The head of the Ancient Egyptian Antiquities Sector, Mahmoud Afifi, said in a statement on Monday that the remains were located north of King Sneferu's bent pyramid in the Dahshur royal necropolis, about 40km south of Cairo.

    Owing to the bent slope of its sides, the pyramid is believed to have been ancient Egypt's first attempt to build a smooth-sided pyramid.

    The necropolis was the burial site for courtiers and high-ranking officials.

    Adel Okasha, the head of Dahshur necropolis, said that the remains belong to the inner structure of the pyramid, including a corridor. Other remains included blocks showing the interior design of the pyramid.

    SOURCE: AP news agency


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