How Panama is saving the world's frogs

A state-of-the-art laboratory allows researchers to look at ways to protect the amphibians from deadly fungus.

by

    Gamboa - Frogs are disappearing at an unprecedented rate around the world due to a fungus that is spreading fast.

    About a third of the world's amphibian species are in danger of extinction and around 40 percent of frog species have already been wiped out.

    So, there is a new push to ensure the amphibians' long-term survival at a new laboratory in Panama which is home to three species of endangered frogs.

    A new state-of-the-art laboratory is allowing researchers to look at ways to protect the amphibians from the fungus and get them back into the wild.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    FGM: The last cutting season

    FGM: The last cutting season

    Maasai women are spearheading an alternative rite of passage that excludes female genital mutilation.

    'No girl is safe': The mothers ironing their daughters' breasts

    Victims of breast ironing: It felt like 'fire'

    Cameroonian girls are enduring a painful daily procedure with long lasting physical and psychological consequences.

    Could mega-dams kill the mighty River Nile?

    Could mega-dams kill the mighty River Nile?

    For Ethiopia, a new dam holds the promise of much-needed electricity; for Egypt, the fear of a devastating water crisis.