How Panama is saving the world's frogs

A state-of-the-art laboratory allows researchers to look at ways to protect the amphibians from deadly fungus.

by

    Gamboa - Frogs are disappearing at an unprecedented rate around the world due to a fungus that is spreading fast.

    About a third of the world's amphibian species are in danger of extinction and around 40 percent of frog species have already been wiped out.

    So, there is a new push to ensure the amphibians' long-term survival at a new laboratory in Panama which is home to three species of endangered frogs.

    A new state-of-the-art laboratory is allowing researchers to look at ways to protect the amphibians from the fungus and get them back into the wild.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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