Reebok recalls bracelets after death

Sporting goods company Reebok International says it is likely to conduct a global recall of certain promotional bracelets after a child in the US died of lead poisoning after reportedly swallowing one.

    The bracelets were used to promote children's footwear

    Reebok and the Consumer Product Safety Commission on Thursday announced the US recall of 300,000 of the eight-inch-long metal bracelets that have a heart-shaped charm with "Reebok" engraved on one side.

    They were distributed in the US as gifts with the purchase of various styles of children's footwear sold nationwide from May 2004 to March 2006 for between $33 and $50.

    Reebok later said similar recalls are likely to be issued in Canada, Latin America, the European Union and Asia, with a possible recall of 142,000 bracelets in Britain beginning as early as Friday.

    The recalled jewellery contains high levels of lead, posing a risk of lead poisoning and adverse health effects to young children, the US safety commission said.

    Made in China

    Reebok said about 2000 of the bracelets made in China were shipped to Canada and 172,000 bracelets were shipped to the European Union.

    The company is still trying to get a final number on bracelets that were available in other markets.

    Reebok, acquired by German rival Adidas-Salomon earlier this year, ordered the recall after receiving a report on the death of a four-year-old child in Minneapolis, Minnesota, due to lead poisoning after swallowing a piece of the bracelet.

    Reebok's chief executive, Paul Harrington, said in a statement: "The day we were notified that there might have been a connection between Reebok and this death, we aggressively began our recall process."

    Separately on Thursday, the safety commission said discount retailer Dollar Tree Stores was recalling 580,000 necklaces and rings due to high levels of lead in the products.

    The regulator said no incidents or injuries have been reported in connection with the Dollar Tree products.

    SOURCE: Reuters


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