Palestinian killed in Gaza Strip

Israeli occupation troops have shot and killed a Palestinian gunman in the Gaza Strip as he approached the border fence.

    The PLFP says the dead fighter was one of their group

    Field Commander Lieutenant-Colonel Ari told Israel Radio on Sunday : "Forces in the area noticed suspicious movement ... and when a terrorist began to crawl towards the fence - he had a weapon on him and apparently an ammunition belt - they opened fire and killed him."

       

    The Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine said it had sent the fighter to attack the Israeli kibbutz of Nahal Oz near the Gaza border to mark the third anniversary of Israel's assassination of PFLP leader Abu Ali Mustafa.

     

    The shooting follows other violent incidents in the Gaza Strip when a Palestinian youth was killed and several others injured by Israeli occupation forces in separate clashes.

     

    Last Tuesday, 18-year-old Kamil al-Astal was shot dead by Israeli snipers close to the illegal Jewish settlement of Kissufum just north of the town of Khan Yunis, Palestinian medical sources said.

     

    Earlier on the same day, armoured Israeli bulldozers razed swathes of farmland belonging to the Abadla and Astal families, witnesses told Aljazeera.net.

     

    An Israeli army spokesperson said al-Astal belonged to the Islamic Jihad and was planting a bomb when he was killed, but added that the report could not be verified.

    SOURCE: Aljazeera + Agencies


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