Afghan civilians killed in US air attack

A US bombing raid killed at least six civilians and wounded nine in eastern Afghanistan, after assailants attacked US-appointed government positions, an Afghan official said.

    US forces say they are searching for Taliban and al-Qaida fighters

    The aerial attack followed a night raid by unknown fighters in the Manogi district of Kunar province, deputy provincial police chief, Muhammad Arif Nizami said in Asadabad, Kunar's capital.

    "As a result of the bombing by [US] planes, six civilians have lost their lives, nine more have been injured and eight houses have been demolished in Manogi," Nizami said.

    Nizami said the bombing was carried out at around 2am (2230 GMT).

    Sayid Fazil Akbar, governor of Kunar province, said fighting broke out when 25 rockets were fired at the mayor's office in Mano Gai, 170 km east of the capital city Kabul.

    Police then returned fire.

    Thereafter, "American planes came and bombarded Wardesh village," he added.

    The US military had no immediate comment.

    Lack of services

    The governor speculated as to who was behind the attack, by blaming forces of another tribe led by commander Gulbuddin Hekmatyar.


    About 18,000 US-led troops and the newly formed, ill-equipped and relatively poorly trained Afghan National Army are supposed to provide security for the upcoming elections but US military officials say their troops are still searching for Taliban and al-Qaida fighters.

    Basic services like running water and electricity are practically non-existent in most parts of Afghanstan.

    Afghans blame the US for attacking civilians and at times for firing at random.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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