Temperatures soar in Buenos Aires

The demand for air conditioning triggers power cuts in the Argentinian capital

by
    The hot weather has been relentless this month, with temperatures climbing well over the average of 28C.  [AFP]
    The hot weather has been relentless this month, with temperatures climbing well over the average of 28C. [AFP]

    The heat in Buenos Aires is scorching.

    Temperatures at this time of year usually top at 28C, but this year they have been significantly higher than this and have stayed above average since December 10.

    To cope with the heat, residents have cranked up their air conditioning units, and the surge in demand has caused a wave of black outs across the city.

    This left thousands of portenos, as the locals are known, without power or water, since many buildings depend on pumps for water pressure.

    The problems are caused by continuous under-investment in the electricity network, ever since utility rates were frozen in 2002.

    This has ensured that summer power cuts are a regular occurrence in the Argentinian capital, usually taking place during periods of hot weather.

    Meanwhile, the demand for power continues to soar, reaching a new record of 23,433 MW on December 17.

    Unfortunately the weather is expected to stay hot over the next few days. Temperatures on Tuesday and Wednesday are expected to climb over 35C, meaning power cuts are likely to ruin some people’s Christmas dinners.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Revival: The Muslim Response to the Crusades

    Revival: The Muslim Response to the Crusades

    This part of 'The Crusades: An Arab Perspective' explores the birth of the Muslim revival in the face of the Crusades.

    Going undercover as a sex worker

    Going undercover as a sex worker

    A photojournalist describes how she posed as a prostitute to follow the trade in human flesh.

    Africa is not poor, we are stealing its wealth

    Africa is not poor, we are stealing its wealth

    It's time to change the way we talk and think about Africa.