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Riz Khan
Cyprus: time for formal partition?
If Greek and Turkish Cypriot leaders cannot agree on reunification, is a two-state island the only solution?
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2010 12:33 GMT

For more than three decades now, efforts to resolve the territorial dispute in Cyprus between its Greek and Turkish residents have failed.

Since reunification plans have been rejected, is it time to officially partition the island?

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Greek Cypriot President Dimitris Christofias and Turkish Cypriot leader Dervis Eroglu meet with UN leader Ban Ki-moon this week in what is being called the last-ditch effort to bring peace to Europe's last divided country.

Christofias has repeatedly rejected partition as an option, but Eroglu has long favoured a two-state solution, and sees it as the only feasible option if talks fail.

On Wednesday's Riz Khan, we speak with Ahmet Sozen, director of the Cyprus Policy Center, a think-tank affiliated with Eastern Mediterranean University in Famagusta, Cyprus; Andreas Theophanous, professor of Political Economy at the University of Nicosia; and Lord David Hannay, a British career diplomat who served as Special Representative for Cyprus between 1996-2003.

You can join the conversation. Call in with your questions and comments at our live time of 1630 GMT. Repeats air at 2030 GMT, and the next day at 0130 GMT.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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