The governments of South and North Korea have held the second round of talks despite growing rehetoric of an imminent armed conflict.

The latest standoff began with the explosion of landmines on the southern side of the border - for which South Korea blamed the North. In response, Seoul began broadcasting anti-Pyongyang messages over loudspeakers along the border - infuriating North Korea.

But even as the talks got underway, Seoul said it had no plans to stop the broadcasts.

North Korea and South Korea have remained technically in a state of war since their 1950 conflict ended in a truce and not a peace treaty.

Relations have since been strained, especially after the 2010 sinking of a South Korean warship.

We ask if the latest tension could lead to further escalation. Or would talks open an opportunity for peace in this volatile region?

Presenter: Mike Hanna

Guests:

BJ Kim - Adjunct Professor at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies.

Andrew Leung - Asia Region Strategist.

Robert Kelly - Professor of International Relations and Diplomacy at Pusan National University.

 

Source: Al Jazeera