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Egypt court sentences Brotherhood leader

Mohamed Badie gets life sentence for inciting violence after the removal of Mohamed Morsi from the presidency last year.

Last updated: 05 Jul 2014 20:49
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The presiding judge said the 70-year-old incited violence 'to achieve terrorist aims' [EPA]

The leader of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, Mohamed Badie, has been sentenced to life in prison for inciting violence in street protests last year, an Egyptian television channel has reported.

Egypt's ONTV reported that the presiding judge, Hassan Farid, said the 70-year-old incited violence "to achieve terrorist goals" following the removal of the Brotherhood's Mohamed Morsi from the presidency in July 2013.

A further 36 Brotherhood members were given the same sentence at the Cairo trial, while 10 others were sentenced to death. Many of the co-defendants were tried in absentia.

Badie, who has already received death sentences in two separate cases, was one of thousands of Brotherhood figures and supporters arrested following the army's removal of Morsi.

The Brotherhood has since been listed as a "terrorist movement", with much of its leadership imprisoned, including the former president.

Its supporters have held protests against the government which replaced Morsi, often resulting in clashes.

In March, a court triggered an international outcry when it sentenced 529 alleged Morsi supporters to death for similar charges. The judge subsequently upheld 37 of those sentences and commuted the rest to life in prison.

Morsi, meanwhile, has been in jail since he was overthrown and is on trial for inciting the killing of opposition protesters in December 2012 outside the presidential palace.

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Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
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