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Middle East
Street clashes rock Alexandria
Security forces use tear gas and rubber bullets while battling protesters in Egypt's second largest city.
Last Modified: 23 Nov 2011 03:03
Ongoing clashes in Alexandria have left dozens of people injured, according to witnesses  [Al Jazeera]

Thousands of protesters seeking an end to military rule in Egypt have clashed with police in the country's second biggest city of Alexandria, braving tear gas and rubber bullets.

Witnesses said a person was killed and dozens wounded in the street battles on Tuesday.

Protesters shouted "You dirty government, You sons of dirt" as they gathered in front of the police headquarters, the biggest symbol of the much-hated interior ministry in Alexandria..

Al Jazeera's Rawya Rageh said the location of the protest was significant.

"Consider Mohamed Mahmoud street in Cairo, this is a similar street [in Alexandria]. It is the main vocal point of violence because it is a symbol of the military," said Rageh.  

Earlier on Tuesday, Alexandria's police chief spoke over a loudspeaker to urge protesters to calm down.

Rageh said from the scene that his plea contained an element of self-preservation for authorities. 

"This [the police headquarters] is not only a place of law and order but also a place where there is a large stockpile of weapons. [The police] cannot let the protesters take over," Rageh said.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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