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Europe
Greece unemployment reaches record high
Latest data shows jobless rate has climbed to 23.1 per cent, with more than one million Greeks out of work.
Last Modified: 09 Aug 2012 18:50
Prime Minister Antonis Samaras, left, faces tough challenges as unemployment soars with more austerity ahead [AFP]

The number of Greeks out of work has risen to a new high, with more than one million people unemployed, especially the young, official data shows.

The latest data, published on Thursday, showed that the country's jobless rate climbed to 23.1 per cent in May from 22.6 per cent in April.

Almost 55 per cent of Greeks aged 15-24 are out of work, a desperate situation that fed into the popularity of anti-bailout parties in Greek elections this year.

The government announced plans to revive a labour reserve measure targeting 40,000 public servants for eventual dismissal, in a drive to achieve 11.5bn euros in savings promised to international lenders.

Government officials citing this scheme said Athens intends to shed tens of thousands of temporary contract workers by streamlining its needs across ministries and state entities.

Unemployment in Greece is already more than twice the average rate in the 17 countries sharing the euro and nearly as bad as in Spain where the jobless rate registered 24.6 per cent in the second quarter.

More austerity ahead

"My unemployment benefit runs out in a few months, I hope the government keeps its promise to extend it by another 12 months," said Eva Grigoriou, 42, who lost her job in retail trade as the recession led to cutbacks.

"I don't see light at the end of the tunnel with more austerity ahead. Recovery is being pushed back every year," she said.

The sharp labour market deterioration, coupled with cuts in pay and pensions and a bleak economic outlook, have fuelled anger against the pro-bailout mainstream parties which suffered major losses in two election rounds in May and June.

The data showed 1.147 million people were officially jobless, 37.2 per cent more than in the same month a year earlier.

The bulk of job losses have hit the private sector as most public sector employees enjoy jobs-for-life status.

Other data on Thursday showed Greece's construction sector, once a key growth driver, slumped again in May, as austerity sapped demand for new homes.

The statistics service ELSTAT said 31 per cent fewer building permits were issued than in May 2011.

IOBE, a think-tank, expects the economy will continue to contract for a fifth consecutive year in 2012, forecasting that gross domestic product will shrink 6.9 per cent.

"The unemployment rate could go higher and register 24 per cent from September. Our forecast is that for the year as a whole it will likely average 23.6 per cent," Angelos Tsakanikas, an economist at the IOBE, said.

The conservative-led coalition government is keen to convince international lenders it is committed to bring the economic reforms programme back on track before asking for more time to slash deficits to spread the pain of spending cuts.

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