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Tunisia parliament approves cabinet line-up

Technocratic caretaker government of Prime Minister Mehdi Jomaa tasked with leading the country to fresh elections.

Last updated: 29 Jan 2014 01:08
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Former Industry Minister Mehdi Jomaa is now the country's fifth prime minister since the 2011 revolution [AFP]

Tunisia's parliament has approved a technocratic caretaker government tasked with leading the country out of a bruising political crisis and to fresh elections.

After a marathon session broadcast live on national television early on Wednesday, the line-up proposed by Prime Minister-designate Mehdi Jomaa was approved by 149 politicians, with 20 voting against and 24 abstaining.

The vote was the final act of a political crisis that lasted six months and started after the assassination of assembly member Mohamed Brahmi.

Jomaa, the fifth prime minister since the 2011 revolution, has to deal with a country torn by the revolution, economic difficulties, social unrest, security issues, and not enough funding for the 2014 government budget.

Since the revolution that overthrew Tunisia's dictator, Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, this country of 11 million has been wracked by armed attacks, social unrest and a limping economy.

With 600,000 young people unemployed and 20 percent of the nation mired in poverty, Jomaa said he will seek foreign aid to finance development projects.

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Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
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