[QODLink]
Africa

Tunisia parliament approves cabinet line-up

Technocratic caretaker government of Prime Minister Mehdi Jomaa tasked with leading the country to fresh elections.

Last updated: 29 Jan 2014 01:08
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Former Industry Minister Mehdi Jomaa is now the country's fifth prime minister since the 2011 revolution [AFP]

Tunisia's parliament has approved a technocratic caretaker government tasked with leading the country out of a bruising political crisis and to fresh elections.

After a marathon session broadcast live on national television early on Wednesday, the line-up proposed by Prime Minister-designate Mehdi Jomaa was approved by 149 politicians, with 20 voting against and 24 abstaining.

The vote was the final act of a political crisis that lasted six months and started after the assassination of assembly member Mohamed Brahmi.

Jomaa, the fifth prime minister since the 2011 revolution, has to deal with a country torn by the revolution, economic difficulties, social unrest, security issues, and not enough funding for the 2014 government budget.

Since the revolution that overthrew Tunisia's dictator, Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, this country of 11 million has been wracked by armed attacks, social unrest and a limping economy.

With 600,000 young people unemployed and 20 percent of the nation mired in poverty, Jomaa said he will seek foreign aid to finance development projects.

164

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.