FARC rebels in Colombian jungle

Rare look at a camp belonging to fighters in what could be their last days there before a landmark peace deal is signed.

| War & Conflict, Politics, Latin America, Colombia

The Colombian government is close to signing a historic peace agreement with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) rebel group.

After 51 years of often brutal conflict and three previous failed negotiations, FARC fighters seem finally ready to give up their guns.

FARC and the government have been negotiating for three years in Havana, Cuba.


Read more: Meeting Colombia's FARC rebels


So far, they have reached a deal on three of the five points on the agenda: rural development, the future political participation of FARC, and how to deal with the illegal drug trade.

But most important, they recently announced a deal on the thorniest issue of transitional justice, which details the way those responsible for crimes against humanity will be punished.

It is a breakthrough that opens the door to a final agreement.

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos says he expects to sign the peace deal before the end of March, and a full bilateral ceasefire is in the works.

However, important details remain that need to be ironed out.

Al Jazeera gained rare access to a camp belonging to the Eastern Bloc of FARC, the strongest military faction, in what could be their last days in the jungle.

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