Typhoon Kalmaegi slams into the Philippines

The largest island of Luzon is hit by extensive flooding.

by
    Flooding from the typhoon was chest-deep in places, with landslides forcing the closure of a number of roads [EPA]
    Flooding from the typhoon was chest-deep in places, with landslides forcing the closure of a number of roads [EPA]

    The Philippines has been battered by Typhoon Kalmaegi.

    The typhoon, known locally as Luis, made landfall in northeastern Luzon around 12 GMT on Sunday.

    As it slammed into the island it was the equivalent of a category 2 hurricane on the five-point Saffir-Simpson scale.

    The winds were howling at about 160kph, but it was the rains that caused the majority of the problems.

    Dagupan, on the west coast of Luzon, was hit by 398mm of rain which is more than is expected in the entire wet month of September.

    The city, home to more than 160,000 people, is now flooded, but the heavier rain was actually a little further north, fortunately in the less populated mountainous regions.

    Flooding was reported to be chest-deep in places, and flash flooding and landslides forced the closure of a number of roads. Many locations are still without electricity.

    Typhoon Kalmaegi is now heading across the South China Sea towards the Chinese province of Hainan. Landfall is expected around 0GMT on Tuesday, but much of southern China and northern Vietnam are bracing for torrential rain and extensive flooding.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    The shocking story of Israel's disappeared babies

    The shocking story of Israel's disappeared babies

    New information has come to light about thousands of mostly Yemeni children believed to have been abducted in the 1950s.

    Stories from the sex trade

    Stories from the sex trade

    Dutch sex workers, pimps and johns share their stories.

    Inside the world of India's booming fertility industry

    Inside the world of India's booming fertility industry

    As the stigma associated with being childless persists, some elderly women in India risk it all to become mothers.