Remnants of Typhoon Matmo hit China

The powerful storm system has caused problems in the east of the country.

by
    Remnants of Typhoon Matmo hit China
    Matmo hit China’s eastern Fujian province, bringing rainfall totals in excess of 200mm. [EPA]

    Matmo formed in the open waters of the western Pacific. Initially, it weakened due to the nearby presence of Typhoon Rammasun, but by 17 July it had been upgraded to a Tropical Storm.

    It tracked across central Taiwan, producing up to 600mm of rain, killing one person and causing considerable damage.  At least 48 people died in a plane crash in the Taiwan Strait which may have been the result of the presence of Matmo.

    As a weakening tropical cyclone, Matmo hit China’s eastern Fujian province, bringing rainfall totals in excess of 200mm.

    As the storm system continued to disintegrate over land, it brought flooding to the provinces of Anhui and Jiangxi. Jiujiang City in the latter province was badly affected and 10,000 residents were evacuated from their homes.

    A total of 400,000 Chinese people have been affected by Matmo, the tenth typhoon to have affected the country in 2014.

    Last week’s typhoon, Rammasun, killed 46 people with another 25 reported missing.


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