Sporting weather on an international scale

A collection of recent pictures from around the world showing sporting events that have been affected by the weather.

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    Conditions should be ideal for this year's Bog Snorkelling Championships which will be held in just over a month's time. The event is scheduled to take place on Sunday 26th August.

     The UK has seen record rainfall this June and July looks set to be disappointingly unsettled too. This weekend could see further flooding across parts of the UK as two bands of very heavy rain are set to cross the country today and into Saturday.

     An amber weather warning - the second highest, and meaning "be prepared" has been issued by the UK Met Office. Up to 100mm of rain could fall in 36 hours during the downpours. The average UK rainfall for July is 69.9mm.

     This will be the 27th Bog Snorkelling Championships. The event is held annually in Llanwrtyd Wells. Hundreds of participants from around the world and plenty of spectators are expected to soak up the sun if not get drenched in the rain.

     The current World Champion in an amazing time of 1 minute 24.22 seconds, is Andrew Holmes from Yorkshire, and the Junior and Female World Champion is Dineka McGuire from Northern Ireland in an equally astounding 1 minute 27.43 seconds.

     Last years' bog snorkellers included several stag parties and participants from South Africa, Australia and Canada making this a truly international event.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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