Stormy weather blasts Southern Africa

Five dead after two days of severe weather.

by

    Snow coats the ground after a cold front brings heavy snow and cold weather to many parts of southern Africa [EPA]

    Five people are reported to have died after torrential rain and cold weather battered South Africa and Lesotho.

    The temperatures dropped so low, that two people froze to death in the icy conditions.

    Their bodies were discovered early Sunday morning, lying by the side of two separate roads in the south of the Eastern Cape Province.

    According to the South African Weather Service, temperatures as low as -9C (16F) were recorded.

    As the cold weather raged, snow blocked several major highways, stranding dozens of drivers.

    The snow, which is unusual in Southern Africa, trapped 41 drivers who were travelling along Lesotho’s Butha Buthe pass. All were later rescued, but many of whom were suffering from slight hypothermia and dehydration.

    As well as heavy snow, record rainfall was also reported in some districts.

    In Port Elizabeth, three people drowned and 2,000 people were evacuated as torrential rain lashed the city.

    118mm of rain was reported in just two days, and some residents are still waiting for their power to be restored.

    The weather has now improved across the majority of South Africa, but cold weather is still persisting across the Eastern Cape.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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