Europe's beautiful weather leads to drought

Almost summer-like weather conditions attributed to stubborn high pressure systems.

    Europe has been experiencing almost summer-like weather over the last several months [File: EPA]

    If you've travelled to Europe recently you may have applauded the beautiful, almost summer-like weather that has been seen over the last several months. 

    Sun and above average temperatures have been the norms for central and northern parts of Europe, when this time of year spring showers should be rumbling through frequently.
     
    The reason for all this beautiful weather has been because of stubborn high pressure systems over the continent. These tend to leave skies clearer and temperatures warmer.
     
    While it is a welcome exit from winter, persistent weather of this kind does have its downside. A drought scenario over much of Europe has set up and looks like it will continue with little relief until June at the earliest. 

    Many places across Europe saw less than 40 per cent of their long-term average rainfall from February to April, with even the wettest areas seeing less than 80 per cent of their mean.
     
    We are forecasting that the extremely dry conditions will continue to be across southern France and Germany. 

    Only a few scattered light rain showers in the grain producing heartland of Europe expected, which would not compensate for the months of unseasonal dry weather.
     
    The higher temperatures and decrease in rainfall have also put a double burden on energy. 

    While the population has demanded more power during these warmer months, hydro electric plants have been producing less energy due to a lack of water in their reserves.  

    This has also had a knock on effect which could also mean that EU carbon emissions prices rise as generators are forced to burn more coal to make up for the energy deficit. 

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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