The 'Sykes-Picot' borders ISIL wants gone

Borders set up by allied powers after the defeat of the Ottomans are a source of resentment for many in the region

    A hundred years after it started, the consequences of the First World War continue to be felt in the Middle East, as ISIL sets about realising its vision of removing the borders that were defined in its aftermath.

    The boundaries of the modern Middle East were drawn up after the war ended by French diplomat Francois Georges-Picot and British officer Sir Mark Sykes, out of territory lost by the Ottoman Empire.

    Al Jazeera's Dominic Kane explains.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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