Egypt marks third year of Mubarak ouster

Country's path towards democracy was cut short last July when Mohamed Morsi was deposed by army.

    Three years ago on February 11, Tahrir Square in central Cairo was a scene of jubilation as the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak was announced by a senior army officer.

    A year later, Mohamed Morsi, of the Muslim Brotherhood, became the first democratically elected president.

    But Morsi was deposed last July by the military following massive protests against his one-year-old government.

    Army field marshal Abdel Fattah el-Sisi installed an interim government, which declared the Brotherhood as a terrorist group.

    Analysts say the growing power of the army and the police is a sign of the old regime.

    "Mubarak’s status quo was corrupt and repressive, but there are levels in terms of corruption and repression," Omar Ashour, an Egyptian political analyst, told Al Jazeera's Hashim Ahelbarra.

    "What Egypt is witnessing at the moment is probably the worst repressive period in its history," he said.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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