End to Egypt energy crisis prompts questions

As recent fuel shortages end, Muslim Brotherhood says crisis was manufactured to encourage anti-Morsi protests.

    In the lead up to the June 30 rallies that preceded the overthrow of Egypt’s President Mohammed Morsi by the army the country was in the middle of a fuel crisis hitting petrol and electricity supplies.

    But for now, both issues appear to be solved, and many people are asking how?

    The Muslim Brotherhood says people who backed the coup deliberately caused shortages to encourage people onto the street to demonstrate against Morsi.

    However, energy experts have told Al Jazeera that a temporary shortage of fuel became more serious when people started panic buying before June 30, and since then electricity use has dropped because people have been out protesting.

    Al Jazeera's Nicole Johnston reports from Cairo.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    How different voting systems work around the world

    How different voting systems work around the world

    Nearly two billion voters in 52 countries around the world will head to the polls this year to elect their leaders.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    The great plunder: Nepal's stolen treasures

    The great plunder: Nepal's stolen treasures

    How the art world's hunger for ancient artefacts is destroying a centuries-old culture. A journey across the Himalayas.