Political elite dominate Yemen dialogue

Youths who organised and died for the revolution say it has been hijacked by long-standing political groups.

    Two years after protests in Yemen ended more than three decades of autocratic rule, hopes that the country would be governed by a new generation of young leaders are fading away.

    Youths, who often led the revolution and died in the process, say the process has been hijacked by long-standing groups such as the Socialists, former opposition, Houthis and even the former ruling party.

    On Monday, the country began a six-month national reconciliation dialogue that brings together more than 500 delegates representing all political factions to draft a new constitution.

    But can Yemeni leaders put their disagreements aside and move the peace process forward?

    Al Jazeera's Hashem Ahelbarra reports from Sanaa.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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