Traffic chaos blights Egypt's capital

Problem finds second spot in president's priorities list in country where accidents kill thousands every year.

    The chaos on the streets of Cairo has worsened since last year's revolution that toppled Egypt's longtime president Hosni Mubarak.
     
    Egypt's notorious traffic claims the lives of thousands of people every year. Drivers casually disrespect the discredited police force, which is rarely anywhere to be seen in the first place.

    President Mohamed Morsi has listed traffic as second only to security among the top five priorities for his first 100 days in office.

    Earlier this year, the World Bank agreed to loan Egypt $250m to improve public transport and traffic in Cairo. It willl also help in forming a new transport authority.

    Al Jazeera's Rawya Rageh reports from Cairo.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'We will cut your throats': The anatomy of Greece's lynch mobs

    The brutality of Greece's racist lynch mobs

    With anti-migrant violence hitting a fever pitch, victims ask why Greek authorities have carried out so few arrests.

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    How a homegrown burger joint pioneered a food revolution and decades later gave a young, politicised class its identity.

    From Cameroon to US-Mexico border: 'We saw corpses along the way'

    'We saw corpses along the way'

    Kombo Yannick is one of the many African asylum seekers braving the longer Latin America route to the US.