Yemen's 'untouchables' doubtful of change

The Akhdam caste live in slums and work menial jobs, with little regard given to their basic human rights.

    Distinguished by their dark skin, Yemen's 'untouchables', who prefer to be called the marginalised ones, are a caste languishing at society's lowest social order.

    Named the Akhdam, an Arabic word for servant, they are confined to living in slums and working menial jobs, with no regard given to their basic human rights.

    Activists and community leaders are fighting to eliminate stereotypes and destroy the stigma that surrounds them.

    But there is a growing sense among many Akhdam that there is nothing they can do to put an end to the pervasive culture of discrimination and prejudice.

    In the second in a three-part series called "Breaking The Bonds," Al Jazeera's Hashem Ahelbarra reports from Sanaa.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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