Iraq's autistic children find a helping hand

Institute educates and socialises autistic children overlooked by Iraq's education system.

    Iraqi activist Nibras Sadoun has literally adopted the issue of autism in Iraq. While conducting field research in special education, she took in an autistic child who had been abandoned by his mother.

    Now Sadoun oversees six countrywide offices of the Al Rahman Institute, which is named after her son. The institute helps educate and socialise autistic children, who are often overlooked by Iraq's educational system.

    The government does not provide Al Rahman with any funding, but parents say the institute is a lifeline for their children.

    Al Jazeera's Jane Arraf reports from Baghdad.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Since March 2015, Saudi Arabia and a coalition of Arab states have launched more than 19,278 air raids across Yemen.

    Lost childhoods: Nigeria's fear of 'witchcraft' ruins young lives

    Lost childhoods: Nigeria's fear of 'witchcraft' ruins young lives

    Many Pentecostal churches in the Niger Delta offer to deliver people from witchcraft and possession - albeit for a fee.

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    No, it wasn't because of WMDs, democracy or Iraqi oil. The real reason is much more sinister than that.