Graffiti convey stories of Egypt revolution

One of the revolution's most violent battlegrounds now serves as a canvas for creative street art.

    Running south from Tahrir Square towards Egypt's interior ministry in central Cairo, Mohamed Mahmoud street has become one of the revolution's most violent battlegrounds. Twelve people died in the area during the February street battles between protesters and police arising from a deadly football riot in Port Said.

    With the neighbourhood calm, at least for the moment, Mohamed Mahmoud now serves as a canvas for some of Egypt's most creative revolutionary street art.

    Murals portraying the revolution's dead as martyrs and the military as a predatory monster spread along walls next to figurative paintings that draw inspiration from millennia-old pharaonic art. Nearby, the artists debate with anxious business owners, and the revolution continues.

    Al Jazeera's Rawya Rageh reports from Cairo.

    SOURCE: Aljazeera


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