Growing divide emerges in Yemen's south

Prospect of elections brings little sign of unity, as some call for a separate state in the south.

    The prospect of the forthcoming elections in Yemen is showing little sign of bringing unity to the country.

    The vote, along with the departure of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, form part of a Gulf-brokered deal designed to end a year of political upheaval.

    But there are renewed calls for a separate state in the country's south. Flags of South Yemen have been flying everywhere in the southern port city of Aden, a symbol of the South Yemen republic that joined the North in 1990.

    These protesters say they lost everything when they joined the union - their lands confiscated, rights denied and oil revenues taken away by the former government.

    Al Jazeera's Hashem Ahelbarra reports from Aden.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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