Egyptians divided on political future

With parliamentary elections due at the end of the year, differences of opinion are evident in recurrent street clashes.



    Six months on from the Egyptian revolution, cracks are appearing among the groups and forces that came together to oust the government of Hosni Mubarak.

    With parliamentary elections due at the end of the year, recurrent street clashes have been a stark reminder of the deep differences over Egypt's democratic future.

    "When you move beyond the specific demands into what is it that is driving people, then there are different visions," Alaa Abdel Fatah, an activist, said.

    "Are we trying to topple the military council or are we trying to force them to toe the line and implement the revolution's demands? And if we are trying to get rid of them in one way or another, what is the alternative?"

    For 18 days Egyptians stood united in their aim to topple Mubarak's presidency. Cracks are appearing between groups, each with their own vision of what the new Egypt should look like.

    Al Jazeera's Sherine Tadros reports from Cairo.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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