Hajj safety conveys past disasters

Security measures at the annual Hajj in Saudi Arabia this year convey the past disasters seen at the pilgrimage.


    The day for stoning the devil is one of the most important rituals at the Hajj pilgrimage.

    In Saudi Arabia millions of Muslims worshippers descended from Mount Arafat, clad in white robes as a sign of purity to perform the stoning. They collected stones from Muzda-lifa to symbolically throw at the devil at Mina.

    The sheer number of people means this part of the journey is the most dangerous.

    Al Jazeera's Imran Garda explains why, and what the Saudis are doing about it.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    From Zimbabwe to England: A story of war, home and identity

    The country I saw as home, my parents saw as oppressors

    What happens when you reject the identity your parents fought for and embrace that of those they fought against?

    Becoming Ocean: When you and the world are drowning

    Becoming Ocean: When you and the world are drowning

    One woman shares the story of her life with polycystic kidney disease and sees parallels with the plight of the planet.

    The evening death came for me: My journey with PTSD

    The evening death came for me: My journey with PTSD

    On a gorgeous Florida evening, a truck crashed into me. As I lay in intensive care, I learned who had been driving it.