Hajj safety conveys past disasters

Security measures at the annual Hajj in Saudi Arabia this year convey the past disasters seen at the pilgrimage.


    The day for stoning the devil is one of the most important rituals at the Hajj pilgrimage.

    In Saudi Arabia millions of Muslims worshippers descended from Mount Arafat, clad in white robes as a sign of purity to perform the stoning. They collected stones from Muzda-lifa to symbolically throw at the devil at Mina.

    The sheer number of people means this part of the journey is the most dangerous.

    Al Jazeera's Imran Garda explains why, and what the Saudis are doing about it.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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