Sharp bee decline 'linked to pesticides'

Pesticides may be contributing to declining population of bees, which pollinate a third of mankind's food.

    'Once the bees have left the earth, man will have four years left on the planet', Albert Einstein once said.

    It has not happened yet, but the world's bee population is in steep decline. It matters because bees pollinate the plants that produce a third of all the food mankind eats.

    Now there is growing evidence that certain pesticides may be contributing to the bees' decline - they are called neonicotinoids and their use is already restricted in some countries, but not the UK.

    Al Jazeera's Simon McGregor-Wood reports from London.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'We will cut your throats': The anatomy of Greece's lynch mobs

    The brutality of Greece's racist lynch mobs

    With anti-migrant violence hitting a fever pitch, victims ask why Greek authorities have carried out so few arrests.

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    How a homegrown burger joint pioneered a food revolution and decades later gave a young, politicised class its identity.

    From Cameroon to US-Mexico border: 'We saw corpses along the way'

    'We saw corpses along the way'

    Kombo Yannick is one of the many African asylum seekers braving the longer Latin America route to the US.