Russian civic movement claims victories

Anti-corruption activists embarrass several deputies from Putin's party with revelations of their undeclared assets.

    Trust in public officials is low in Russia, and there is a growing civic movement determined to expose their vices.

    Bloggers have of late embarrassed several officials loyal to Vladimir Putin, exposing their undeclared assets.

    Mindful of growing public resentment towards the elite, the Russian president has promised to fight corruption.

    He dismissed the defence minister, Anatoly Serdyukov, over corrupt allegations in November. But Serdyukov is yet to face charges.

    Observers say Putin cannot afford to push too far. On the face of it, civic activists have scored direct hits on Putin allies, with several resignations so far in parliament.

    But, as Al Jazeera's Robin Forestier-Walker reports from Moscow, there is a note of caution too.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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