Georgia wine trade bounces back

Country finds new markets to overcome Russian trade embargo that made sales tumble by 80 per cent six years ago.

    Archaeologists think viniculture began in Georgia. In the eastern Georgia town of Kakheti, wine-making is thought to have begun some eight thousand years ago.

    The industry nearly died out six years ago, when a Russian trade embargo cut wine makers off from their biggest market and foreign sales tumbled by 80 per cent.

    The business is now bouncing back after the country found new markets in Europe, the US and China.

    Al Jazeera's Rory Challands reports from Kakheti.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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