London police under fire for death

Court ruling over man's death during G20 protests in 2009 further discredits police tactic.

    The family of the UK man who died as a result of a baton strike and a push from a police officer during a protest in London has welcomed the findings of an inquest two years after his death.

    Police handling of 2009's G20 protests has been heavily criticised and the tactic of hemming protesters in, called 'kettling', has since been ruled unlawful by Britain’s High Court. But it was the fate of a homeless, alcoholic newspaper seller on his way home that has proved most damaging for the Metropolitan police force.

    While police are saying it was just one officer behaving badly - their crowd control tactics are looking increasingly discredited. 

    Al Jazeera's Rory Challands has the story from London.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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