Sri Lanka law pushes for reduced paint lead

New law in Sri Lanka requires reduction in lead content in paints, which is harmful to humans.

    The dangers of lead poisoning from paint have been well documented.

    But many countries still allow lead-based paint to be manufactured. It is often used in offices and homes.

    Lead from paint dusk or flakes is easily inhaled or ingested - especially by children.

    It is believed millions of youngsters have been affected. They are most at risk because their bodies are smaller and still developing. Low level lead poisoning makes children appear inattentive and irritable.

    Higher levels can result in delayed growth, slow learning and hearing loss.

    Lead poisoning also affects adults. Globally, it kills around 670,000 people each year.

    In Sri Lanka, new rules were brought in after a study found that many paints contained dangerously high levels of the substance.

    Al Jazeera's Minelle Fernandez reports from Colombo.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Since March 2015, Saudi Arabia and a coalition of Arab states have launched more than 19,278 air raids across Yemen.

    Lost childhoods: Nigeria's fear of 'witchcraft' ruins young lives

    Lost childhoods: Nigeria's fear of 'witchcraft' ruins young lives

    Many Pentecostal churches in the Niger Delta offer to deliver people from witchcraft and possession - albeit for a fee.

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    No, it wasn't because of WMDs, democracy or Iraqi oil. The real reason is much more sinister than that.