S Korea turns trash into eco-attraction

Operators of the world's largest landfill want to transform the Incheon site into a destination for eco-tourists.

    With 16,000 tonnes of rubbish being added daily, South Korea's Sudokwon Landfill Number Two is the largest global waste site. But site operators are not letting the 1,000 daily lorries delivering the detritus of 22 million people stand in the way of proposed plans to turn it into an eco-attraction.

    For proof of concept, managers point to a Dream Park, just a few hundred metres at what was then the world's largest landfill, Landfill Number One, which will reopen as a public golf course next year.

    Some residents, citing a lingering smell and a local government study that found airborne levels of hydrogen sulphide hundreds of times over the legal limit, are not sold on the image of an environmental work of art created from the piles of rubbish of half the nation's population.

    Al Jazeera's Harry Fawcett reports from the Sudokwon Landfill in Incheon, South Korea.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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