Pakistan group's relief work hailed

Local charity groups step into vacuum left by the government to aid Pakistan's floods victims.

    While the Pakistani government's response to the humanitarian crisis caused by devastating floods has been criticised, local charity organisations and religious groups are earning praise from the public for their efforts.

    Al Jazeera's Bernard Smith reports from Swat Valley in northern Pakistan that one group that has been gaining popularity for its relief work in recent days is Jamaat-ud-Dawa, an Islamic group banned by the government.

    Jamaat-ud-Dawa has been accused of being a front group for Lashkar-e-Taiba, which is believed to be behind the 2008 Mumbai attacks.

    The charity group is also seen as promoting a strict interpretation of Islam, which is at odds with the secular government of Pakistan.

    Many are concerned that the group will gain more support from Pakistanis as a result of its efforts.

    But Mosharraf Zaidi, a Pakistan analyst, told Al Jazeera from the capital Islamabad that Jamaat-ud-Dawa's increased popularity won't translate into greater political clout.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    From Qatar to Alaska, a personal journey exploring what it means to belong when your culture is endangered.