Disabled struggle for a place in Jakarta

Physically impaired Indonesians now have more chances, but face lax enforcement of laws for their benefit.

    Fikri spends his days in a wheelchair, begging from drivers on the busy streets of Jakarta.

    Even in Indonesia's capital, the country's laws requiring special assistance for the disabled are not being enforced.

    Few businesses want to employ Fikri, who lost his legs in a train accident, while blind Indonesians still face trouble moving about, lacking even special seats on trains.

    Though treatment of the disabled is improving - blind people are no longer relegated to dodgy massage parlors where they once found steady employment - many changes remain unmade.

    Step Vaessen reports from Jakarta.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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