Fears that safer Tokyo means loss of heritage

Citizens fear loss of as history as planners strengthen city's defences against earthquakes.

    After the twin disasters of the earthquake and tsunami last year, city planners in Tokyo say they are aiming to rebuild the city so that it is safer and better protected from natural disasters.

    It has been estimated if a magnitude seven earthquake struck directly beneath Japan's capital today, at least 390,000 homes would be destroyed. The government says it is aiming to lower that number drastically in the next ten years.

    Locals, however, fear that in modernising the city's defences against the elements, they will also lose part of its history.

    Al Jazeera's Marga Ortigas reports from Tokyo.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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