Questioning the death penalty in Japan

Country begins debate on abolishing capital punishment, but more than 80 per cent of people support practice.

    There are 120 people currently on death row in Japan, with polls showing capital punishment is supported by more than 80 per cent of the population.

    However, some in the country have reservations and object to the practice on moral grounds.

    Japan has recently begun a debate on whether to abolish the law, with a small group of politicians planning to raise the issue in parliament.

    But with the wide majority of views still in favour of the death penalty, many doubt that the law will be changed.

    Al Jazeera's Steve Chao reports from Nagoya.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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