Peru divided over 1997 Japan embassy siege

New evidence into 1997 siege of Japan's embassy renews controversy over hostage-takers deaths.

    Fifteen years after the Peruvian army stormed the Japanese embassy in Lima to rescue 72 hostages, the circumstances around the event still proves divisive.

    For nearly five months, fighters from the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement had held dozens hostage in the Japanese embassy following a party attended by politicians, judges, and foreign diplomats.

    Since the 1997 raid that killed hostage-takers, however, there have been ongoing questions over the nature of the deaths of the 14 fighters in the embassy at the time.

    In particular, the death of Eduardo Cruz, known as "Comrade Tito" left some asking if he and two other fighters had been killed in combat during the siege, or captured and later murdered?

    New evidence has reignited the decade-old controversy.

    Al Jazeera's Mariana Sanchez reports from Lima.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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