Hope in South Africa's fight against HIV/AIDS

The rate of mother-to-child transmissions dropped from 3.5 per cent to 2.7 per cent in one year.

    Fewer babies are being born with HIV in South Africa, according to government officials - a major improvement for a country with a bad track record for fighting the virus.

    Former President Thabo Mbeki drew worldwide criticism when he questioned the link between HIV and AIDS, and the drugs used to treat the disease.

    A state health programme has since been designed to prevent HIV-positive mothers from infecting their babies. The rate of mother-to-child transmissions dropped from 3.5 per cent to 2.7 per cent between 2010 and 2011.

    Al Jazeera's Haru Mutasa reports from Cape Town.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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