Libya's ancient Leptis Magna now a ghost town

Revolution and increasing attacks by armed groups deter tourists, halting valuable funds for excavations.

    North Africa's most well-preserved Roman ruin used to be a bustling tourist attraction, but since the revolution Libya's Leptis Magna is now a ghost town.

    Prior to the revolution that ousted Muammar Gaddafi, the seaport, which historically served as a gateway to Africa from Rome, was bustling with foreign and local tourists.

    But now, with increasing attacks by armed groups and a general feelings of instability, the tourist dollars are drying up.

    Without such revenue, the 2,100 year old city, and the secrets within it, are at risk of being lost due to lack of funds for renovations and new excavations.

    Al Jazeera's Imran Khan reports from Leptis Magna.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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