Durban tries to put garbage to good use

South African city ready to generate electricity from landfill waste, but awaits UN approval to sell carbon credits.

    It is home to one of the biggest landfills in Africa, but now the South African city of Durban is trying to put its garbage to good use. The decomposing waste creates methane and carbon dioxide gas which is used to create electricity.

    Every tonne of methane destroyed is worth 21 carbon credits which can then be sold on the market. This plant in Durban makes 20,000 carbon credits per month but none can be sold until they receive UN certification.

    As Al Jazeera's Haru Matasa reports, while South Africa waits for the go-ahead, the rubbish piles up in Durban.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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