Libya displays evidence of cluster bombs

In Misrata, scene of some of the worst fighting during the uprising, residents peruse weapons of war.

    In Misrata, a coastal city that saw some of the fiercest fighting during the uprising against Muammar Gaddafi this spring, residents can now peruse evidence of the weapons used against them.

    Among the shells and canisters from Britain, France, Russia, Serbia and others are Spanish-made MAT-120 "mortar cargo bombs," a cluster munition that became infamous when journalists and Human Rights Watch discovered its use by Gaddafi's forces during Misrata's siege.

    Not long after Spain sold the MAT-120s to Libya in 2008, it signed the international ban on such weapons. Ali Muhamad, a fighter turned curator at the streetside weapons expo, said he had never heard of cluster bombs before Misrata but soon became used to their distinct whistle and explosion.

    "To profit from this killing and destruction is wrong," Muhamad said.

    Al Jazeera's Anita McNaught reports from Misrata.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Learn what India's parties' symbols mean by drawing them

    Learn what India's parties' symbols mean by drawing them

    More than 2,300 political parties have registered for the largest electoral exercise in the world.

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Since March 2015, Saudi Arabia and a coalition of Arab states have launched more than 19,278 air raids across Yemen.

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    No, it wasn't because of WMDs, democracy or Iraqi oil. The real reason is much more sinister than that.