Leftover munitions blight DR Congo

Mines left over from the 1990s remain threat to locals, with area around Kisangani airport one of the worst hit.

    Landmines left over from the 1990s still pose a big risk in parts of the Democratic Republic of Congo, where thousands of people have been killed or maimed by the devices.

    Now, years later, as the nation hopes to move forward, officials are trying to remove the munitions that hinder its people from a life of safety and security.

    One of the worst affected places is the area surrounding Kisangani's airport.

    Al Jazeera's Nazanine Moshiri reports from the northeastern city.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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